Welcome to the batcave. Anyways, I'm Liss. If you have another nickname for me feel free to use it. Full description in the 'about me' link.

Since they don't fit in the links, here are my OTPs:

OTP: Laugh About It

OTP: Just Hold Me

my heterosexual life partner


6 hours ago | 1,272 notes | Reblog
Tags:
young justice
signal boost
DC Comics: Publish a Digital 1st Young Justice Season 3 Series.

nygma619:

Want Young Justice to continue in some way. Digital comics is probably the least expensive and most realistic chance of telling more stories set in the Earth-16 universe. Especially given that Greg Weisman’s current future has him working on Star Wars: Rebels.  But working on a digital comic along with that doesn’t require as much attention from  someone as Young Justice as an animated series would IF it somehow came back for more seasons.  There’s little to no chance that Greg Weisman would be able to work on Young Justice as an animated series if the show somehow came back in animation.

Continuing the show in digital comic form is one of the few mediums out there that has a realistic shot of retaining 1 of Young Justice’s original creators. Not to mention being the least expensive.

While the number of people that have signed might be relatively small at the moment, I believe that has more to do with the fact that not many Young Justice fans know about this as a possible opportunity.

Yes, petitions don’t have the best reputations around.  But honestly, what have you got to lose by signing it anyways? Also a petition based on asking for a digital comic allegedly might not NEED as many numbers as a petition for wanting the show back. (Which would also be more expensive).

I also feel a realistic 1st goal for this is to at least show there’s interest in this.  Then somewhere down the road, DC MIGHT notice the interest and try to capitalize on an opportunity.

Again what have you got to lose by signing?

9 hours ago | 68,973 notes | Reblog
Tags:
audio
FAVE

Track:

hobgoblinhero:

image

9 hours ago | 7,507 notes | Reblog
Tags:
merlin
Harry Potter

supermaniackles:

nowwhereshallwego:

I like how the Merlin fandom just kind of completely disregarded that the show is over and keeps on trucking and is still really active like whatcha gonna do about it

Merlin and Harry Potter, I am in both fandoms, and the magic will never die because we are fucking immortal wizards

13 hours ago | 8,973 notes | Reblog
Tags:
basically though
he inhaled his scent. he smelled of (ingredient 1), (ingredient 2) and something undefinable, that was uniquely (name of buttsex partner)
every single fanfiction uploaded in the last two years oh my god  (via brood-of-froods)
14 hours ago | 15,923 notes | Reblog
Tags:
swords
reference
art-of-swords:

Sword Facts & Myths
All Medieval swords weighed at least 12 pounds – FALSE
Most Medieval swords weighed around 2.5 lbs - even long hand-and-a-half and two-handed swords weighed less than 4 lbs.
Medieval swords were not sharp - FALSE
Some surviving samples of Medieval swords are still sharp - many are razor-sharp.
All swords should balance within 2” of the guard - FALSE
A sword’s balance should be determined by its function, not an arbitrary standard. Swords intended for cutting often balance 5 or 6 inches from the guard.
Swords were made to cut through armour - FALSE
Period armour was often work- and case-hardened and curved such that it is difficult to hit at a right angle. Late Medieval thrusting swords, even the ones with a reinforced point, were used to thrust into the gaps in armour, not through the plate.
Viking swords were heavier than Medieval swords - FALSE
The Viking sword was a very highly developed sword form. Often the blades were quite thin in cross section, and as a result, were often the same or lighter in overall weight than other similarsized swords.
There is no such thing as the “perfect” sword - TRUE
There are only “perfect” swords for their intended purpose and the tastes of the owner.
A “good” sword should be able to bend past 90 degrees without taking a set - FALSE
Flexibility is only one of the aspects of the steel properties that is important in a sword. Too flexible, and it is inefficient in the thrust and the cut. Too stiff and it is prone to breakage. Most makers are content if a sword will bend to 45 degrees without taking a set.
Real swordfights were just like they are in the movies - FALSE
Swordfights in movies are choreographed for entertainment not authenticity. Edge to edge parries and fancy techniques are designed to heighten drama in a scene. An actual swordfight would be short, brutal and much quieter.
Japanese swords are the sharpest and best swords ever made - FALSE
Japanese swords have many admirable qualities and were well-suited to their intended use, but they are not necessarily sharper or better than a properly designed and sharpened Medieval sword. 
Medieval swordmakers were uneducated barbarians - FALSE
It is apparent from even a cursory study of surviving Medieval swords that blademakers and cutlers were highly skilled artisans with a profound understanding of mathematics and proportion.
Not all swords should be as sharp as a razor - TRUE
The sword’s intended purpose is always the guide to use — thrusting swords are not intended for cutting, so some may not even have an edge at all, just a well-defined and reinforced point.
Swords were tempered in urine or blood - FALSE
The steels smelted in Medieval Europe required either clean water or oil for quenching. Urine or blood would not allow a blade to temper properly.
The “blood groove” is on a sword to release pressure in the wound and allow the sword to come back out - FALSE
"Blood groove" as a term is a recent invention — "fuller" is the proper name for the groove or grooves on a sword blade. The purpose of the fuller has nothing to do with "blood" — fullers reduce weight, assist in the proper distribution of mass in a blade, and help make the blade more stiff.
A good sword can cut through a concrete pillar - FALSE
Swords were intended to cut through flesh, clothing, and (in earlier swords) leather or mail armour. They are not intended to cut wood, concrete or metal pillars, even though that is often seen in films.
A sword will fall apart if you don’t clean the tang of the sword - FALSE
The tang of a sword, if properly made and the rest of the sword properly maintained, will not require any maintenance for generations of use. 
Japanese folded steel is superior to European sword steel - FALSE
Folding steel was a technique used by Japanese smiths to try to get the best steel they could from very poor ore sources. Folded steel blades are more likely than modern monosteels to have large, unseen inclusions of impurities that may in fact critically weaken a blade. By folding the steel billet many, many times, they achieved a more even distribution of carbon and worked most of the impurities out of the steel. The result is stunningly beautiful, but we have to believe that if a 16th C Japanese smith had access to modern monosteels, he would have switched in a heartbeat.
Pattern-welded steel is superior to mono-steel - FALSE
Like folding steel, pattern-welding was a technique used to try to get the best steel from very poor ore sources.  Pattern-welding is the art of hammering together, and then twisting and re-hammering layers of iron (often of varying carbon content). The Celts as far back as the 5th century BC may have made swords by pattern-welding, and this technique was used extensively until at least the end of the 10th century.  After this, better, more consistent iron ore was obtainable, and furnace technology improved, making this laborious technique unnecessary. Also like folded steel blades, pattern welded blades are more likely than modern monosteels to have large, unseen inclusions of impurities that may in fact critically weaken a blade.
Swords are just big knives - FALSE
The design of a sword is far more complex than a knife. Flexibility  balance and vibration are far more critical in a sword-length blade than in a knife-length blade.

Info source: © 2005 Albion Armorers, Inc.
Photo source: © Royal Armouries

art-of-swords:

Sword Facts & Myths

Most Medieval swords weighed around 2.5 lbs - even long hand-and-a-half and two-handed swords weighed less than 4 lbs.

Some surviving samples of Medieval swords are still sharp - many are razor-sharp.

A sword’s balance should be determined by its function, not an arbitrary standard. Swords intended for cutting often balance 5 or 6 inches from the guard.

Period armour was often work- and case-hardened and curved such that it is difficult to hit at a right angle. Late Medieval thrusting swords, even the ones with a reinforced point, were used to thrust into the gaps in armour, not through the plate.

The Viking sword was a very highly developed sword form. Often the blades were quite thin in cross section, and as a result, were often the same or lighter in overall weight than other similarsized swords.

There are only “perfect” swords for their intended purpose and the tastes of the owner.

Flexibility is only one of the aspects of the steel properties that is important in a sword. Too flexible, and it is inefficient in the thrust and the cut. Too stiff and it is prone to breakage. Most makers are content if a sword will bend to 45 degrees without taking a set.

Swordfights in movies are choreographed for entertainment not authenticity. Edge to edge parries and fancy techniques are designed to heighten drama in a scene. An actual swordfight would be short, brutal and much quieter.

Japanese swords have many admirable qualities and were well-suited to their intended use, but they are not necessarily sharper or better than a properly designed and sharpened Medieval sword. 

It is apparent from even a cursory study of surviving Medieval swords that blademakers and cutlers were highly skilled artisans with a profound understanding of mathematics and proportion.

The sword’s intended purpose is always the guide to use — thrusting swords are not intended for cutting, so some may not even have an edge at all, just a well-defined and reinforced point.

The steels smelted in Medieval Europe required either clean water or oil for quenching. Urine or blood would not allow a blade to temper properly.

"Blood groove" as a term is a recent invention — "fuller" is the proper name for the groove or grooves on a sword blade. The purpose of the fuller has nothing to do with "blood" — fullers reduce weight, assist in the proper distribution of mass in a blade, and help make the blade more stiff.

Swords were intended to cut through flesh, clothing, and (in earlier swords) leather or mail armour. They are not intended to cut wood, concrete or metal pillars, even though that is often seen in films.

The tang of a sword, if properly made and the rest of the sword properly maintained, will not require any maintenance for generations of use. 

Folding steel was a technique used by Japanese smiths to try to get the best steel they could from very poor ore sources. Folded steel blades are more likely than modern monosteels to have large, unseen inclusions of impurities that may in fact critically weaken a blade. By folding the steel billet many, many times, they achieved a more even distribution of carbon and worked most of the impurities out of the steel. The result is stunningly beautiful, but we have to believe that if a 16th C Japanese smith had access to modern monosteels, he would have switched in a heartbeat.

Like folding steel, pattern-welding was a technique used to try to get the best steel from very poor ore sources.  Pattern-welding is the art of hammering together, and then twisting and re-hammering layers of iron (often of varying carbon content). The Celts as far back as the 5th century BC may have made swords by pattern-welding, and this technique was used extensively until at least the end of the 10th century.  After this, better, more consistent iron ore was obtainable, and furnace technology improved, making this laborious technique unnecessary. Also like folded steel blades, pattern welded blades are more likely than modern monosteels to have large, unseen inclusions of impurities that may in fact critically weaken a blade.

The design of a sword is far more complex than a knife. Flexibility  balance and vibration are far more critical in a sword-length blade than in a knife-length blade.

Info source: © 2005 Albion Armorers, Inc.

Photo source: © Royal Armouries
14 hours ago | 20,038 notes | Reblog
Tags:
signal boost
intrudaimpala:

bethelionqueen:

oh-snap-pro-choice:

betterthandarkchocolate:

thelipstickontherim:

Bring socks!!!! #homeless #donate #homelessness

As are toiletries!

I would also advice NOT to buy wool socks because yes, they are warm, but wool shrinks very easily, some people are allergic to wool, and wet wool is one of the most uncomfortable things in the world.
Thick cotton socks would be best, they’d last the longest and be the easiest to take care of and clean.
- Jane

Cotton is best. Always cotton

I feel the need to STRESS the necessity of socks. For the event AMOK through Random Acts this year, we went to DTLA to pass out donations. At one point we basically ran out and some of us broke off from the group to buy some more items. We ended up at a convenience store that had two boxes of cotton socks. We bought them and as we were walking one man asked us if we had socks. And we said “Yes.” and gave him a pair and then suddenly we were surrounded by individuals all asking for socks. We were out of socks in a few moments. I can say from personal experience that socks were the most important article of clothing that they wanted.And as far as toiletries go, tampons. TAMPONS AND PADS. One woman was so excited, gracious, and thankful to receive tampons and pads, as it is a donation that seems to be overlooked. So please, of donations that could be given, while all articles of clothing and food and other necessities are more than welcome, socks and tampons and pads are largely needed.

intrudaimpala:

bethelionqueen:

oh-snap-pro-choice:

betterthandarkchocolate:

thelipstickontherim:

Bring socks!!!! #homeless #donate #homelessness

As are toiletries!

I would also advice NOT to buy wool socks because yes, they are warm, but wool shrinks very easily, some people are allergic to wool, and wet wool is one of the most uncomfortable things in the world.

Thick cotton socks would be best, they’d last the longest and be the easiest to take care of and clean.

- Jane

Cotton is best. Always cotton

I feel the need to STRESS the necessity of socks. For the event AMOK through Random Acts this year, we went to DTLA to pass out donations. At one point we basically ran out and some of us broke off from the group to buy some more items. We ended up at a convenience store that had two boxes of cotton socks. We bought them and as we were walking one man asked us if we had socks. And we said “Yes.” and gave him a pair and then suddenly we were surrounded by individuals all asking for socks. We were out of socks in a few moments. I can say from personal experience that socks were the most important article of clothing that they wanted.

And as far as toiletries go, tampons. TAMPONS AND PADS. One woman was so excited, gracious, and thankful to receive tampons and pads, as it is a donation that seems to be overlooked. So please, of donations that could be given, while all articles of clothing and food and other necessities are more than welcome, socks and tampons and pads are largely needed.

14 hours ago | 59,747 notes | Reblog
Tags:
oh my fucjkindsgjk
death note
holy-dildo:

death noot

holy-dildo:

death noot

14 hours ago | 35,576 notes | Reblog

dggeoff:

ibeggedformercytwice:

ibeggedformercytwice:

My medieval servant boy has gone missing. I’ll just use Google to see if I can find him.

image

Oh bother.

im deleting this fucking website

14 hours ago | 185,994 notes | Reblog

ivani3raginsky:

i love people responding to their pets’ noises with ‘i know’

14 hours ago | 7,829 notes | Reblog
Tags:
birds
importantbirds:

awwww-cute:

Hooray!

Tip for marathon: take three step, A celebrate it! Do again until complete 26 mile! Very easy, donot forget hoorays!

importantbirds:

awwww-cute:

Hooray!

Tip for marathon: take three step, A celebrate it! Do again until complete 26 mile! Very easy, donot forget hoorays!